Nov 4 2013 - 6:10pm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 15, 2013

 
Low Power FM Application Window is Closed:
Prometheus Radio Project Helps Thousands to Seize the Airwaves

 
WASHINGTON DC -- On November 15, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) closed the 2013 Low Power FM Application window that allowed for new community radio stations to be licensed.  Nonprofit groups, public safety organizations and Indian Tribes applied for Low Power FM (LPFM) stations on the FCC website. Applications were due by 3pm EST on November 15.

The deadline for this filing window was previously amended two times. The original filing window was slated to be October 15-29, 2013, but was postponed and then extended due to the government shutdown in October. The new deadline was moved to November 14, 2013 6:00pm EST, but as that deadline approached, technical difficulties on the FCC's website prohibited applicants from filing their forms. To allow for access to the site and database, the FCC extended the deadline to November 15, 2013 3:00pm EST.
 

Oct 1 2013 - 7:00pm

UPDATE: 10/18/2013 5:40pm EST : Prometheus has just received confirmed reports from the FCC that: "the deadline for filing Form 318 applications for new Low Power FM stations will be extended from October 29, 2013 until November 14, 2013 6:00pm EST."  The FCC will also reschedule a webinar that had been cancelled during the shutdown for October 24, 2013. More information on this webinar (and others that Prometheus has planned) will be released as we have confirmed registration links.

 

Sep 11 2013 - 3:15pm

 

Thank you so much for your support of our campaign! Thanks to your generosity, we raised over $6,000 which will help our technical and engineering team provide direct support to fledgling community radio stations through materials and resource creation and one-on-one application trouble-shooting. 

Prometheus has been able to provide the kind of support we do because people have believed in our vision of a world in which the media is not a means to limit democratic participation, but a way for communities and movements to express themselves and struggle for justice. We imagine a nationwide community radio infrastructure made up of hundreds of independent, locally-orientated stations, part of a global movement to put media in the hands of the people. With your help over the last month (and for some of you - over the last 15 years!) we are getting closer to that moment. 

Jun 18 2013 - 11:48am

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 17, 2013

Contact: Julia Wierski, Development & Communications Director at Prometheus Radio Project, jwierski [at] prometheusradio.org, 215.727.9620 x 545

FCC Launches Nationwide Application Process for Community Radio:
Prometheus Radio Project Offers Support for Groups to Get on Air

Dec 5 2012 - 4:40pm

FCC anuncia la primera oportunidad
para pequeñas estaciones de radio comunitarias en 12 años

La primera oportunidad para las pequeñas estaciones de radio comunitarias en 12 años llegara en octubre de 2013. Prometheus Radio Project ayudará a los grupos sin fines de lucro para solicitar licencias.

30 de noviembre 2012

Nov 29 2012 - 2:49pm

First opportunity for small community radio stations in 12 years coming in October 2013
Prometheus Radio Project will help nonprofit groups to apply for licenses

November 30, 2012

Washington DC -- Today the Federal Communications Commission announced that for the first time in more than a decade, community groups nationwide will soon be able to start small, local radio stations. Nonprofit organizations, schools, Indian Tribes and public safety agencies can apply for Low Power FM (LPFM) stations in October 2013. For the first time ever, the agency will allow these noncommercial stations in urban areas. 

The news is long-awaited by the Prometheus Radio Project and its supporters, who led the grassroots coalition that pushed Congress to pass the Local Community Radio Act of 2010. The law expanded community radio by directing the FCC to make more channels available nationwide, reversing an earlier law that relegated stations to rural settings. The FCC implemented the law by creating more flexible rules on where new stations can be located. 

“Finally, communities without a voice on the airwaves will have a chance to control their own local media,” said Brandy Doyle, Policy Director for the Prometheus Radio Project. "Thanks to the significant step forward today, we will see a wave of new radio stations that better reflects the diversity of our country.”

The 800+ low power stations already on the air are run by nonprofit groups, colleges, churches, and emergency responders. Many, such as the Oregon farmworker station KCPN, offer local programming in languages other than English, often hard to find on the radio dial. KPCN, also known as Radio Movimiento, plays Spanish-language news and information, organizes voter registration drives, and plays traditional and contemporary music.

Mar 26 2012 - 11:00am

Meet RadioSpark, a new online community where groups that want to start a station and those that want to support them can connect.

Thinking about starting a station? Looking to volunteer and support a station? Sign up and connect with others working in your area. Are you an engineer or a lawyer with services to offer? This is the perfect place to let groups know about skills and availability.

Mar 19 2012 - 11:35am

FCC Decision Opens Radio Airwaves for Communities Nationwide
New rules create opportunities for hundreds of new community radio stations

March 19, 2012

Washington, DC-- In a victory for communities nationwide, today the Federal Communications Commission announced that the agency will open the airwaves for community radio. To make room for a new wave of local stations, the FCC will clear a backlog of over six thousand pending applications for FM translators, which are repeater stations that rebroadcast distant radio stations. The decision will allow for the first new urban community radio stations in decades.

"Today the FCC has opened the door for communities to use their own local airwaves, and that will be transformative," said Brandy Doyle, Policy Director for the Prometheus Radio Project. "We commend the Commission staff for the care and diligence they have shown. We also wish to thank Chairman Genachowski, Commissioner McDowell, and particularly Commissioner Clyburn and her hardworking staff for their efforts on behalf of communities."

The announcement concludes the first hurdle in implementing the Local Community Radio Act, passed by Congress in 2010 after a decade-long grassroots campaign. The FCC is on track to accept applications for new Low Power FM (LPFM) stations nationwide as early as Fall 2012. Community groups are gearing up to apply for the licenses, which will be available only to locally-based non-profit organizations.

Jul 12 2011 - 1:32pm
Prometheus Press Release
7/12/2011

WASHINGTON DC-- On Tuesday morning the Federal Communications Commission proposed rules to create opportunities for low power FM (LPFM) radio in urban areas, bringing community radio to millions of Americans for the first time. Tuesday’s proposal is the FCC’s first step towards implementing the bipartisan Local Community Radio Act.

“I am delighted to see that the FCC is moving forward to carry out legislation I championed for so many years. This is a major victory for community radio, and I urge the FCC to license as many LPFM stations as possible," said Congressman Mike Doyle (D-PA), lead cosponsor of the Local Community Radio Act, which directs the FCC to expand low power radio opportunities and ensure that channels are available for new stations.

Jul 7 2011 - 4:23pm
Ruling represents second historic victory for Prometheus Radio Project this year
Prometheus Press Release
7/7/2011
 

PHILADELPHIA – On Thursday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit issued its long-awaited verdict in Prometheus Radio Project v. the Federal Communications Commission, rejecting the FCC’s attempt to further deregulate media ownership. The Court threw out FCC rules that would have allowed one company to own a newspaper and broadcast stations in the same market. The Court also upheld the FCC’s other limits on local broadcast ownership, and agreed with Prometheus and other public interest groups that the FCC failed to consider the impact of its rules on women and people of color.

"We won on almost every point. This decision is a vindication of the public's right to have a diverse media environment,” said Andrew Jay Schwartzman of Media Access Project, who argued the case on behalf of Prometheus.

This is the second major victory this year for the Prometheus Radio Project, whose ten-year effort to pass legislation expanding community radio succeeded when President Obama signed the bipartisan Local Community Radio Act into law on January 4. The law will result in thousands of new community radio stations, and the FCC will be accepting applications for stations as early as next summer.