Latest news about low power radio, media justice, and the Prometheus Radio Project


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Press Releases

Prometheus in the News

Best of Press


Nov 22 2007 - 12:56am

On Tuesday, November 20, 2007, the Federal Communications Commission announced that it was ready to pass a set of provisions amending the rules that govern the low power FM radio (LPFM) service -- a noncommercial radio service that hundreds of schools, churches, municipalities, and community groups use to connect with their local communities. Below is the press statement of Pete Tridish, founder of the Prometheus Radio Project, on the announcement.

Nov 21 2007 - 4:00am

WPEB broadcasts again from West Philly

By Meir Rinde

Are you a chatty or musical West Philadelphian? Is the bland homogeneity of corporate radio getting you down? Do you have an unfulfilled hankering to broadcast your thoughts on the important issues of the day?

Don't despair. WPEB 88.1 FM is coming to the rescue.

Oct 30 2007 - 8:50pm

Release: Senate Committee Votes to Expand Low Power FM Radio!

 

October 30th, 2007

Contact: Hannah Sassaman, 215.727.9620 x 501, 267.970.4007,

hannahjs(at)prometheusradio.org

The United States Senate Commerce Committee voted this afternoon to substantially expand the number of community media outlets in the United States. In a consensus vote, the Committee moved to report Senate Bill 1675, the Local Community Radio Act of 2007, to the full Senate -- and opened the door for thousands of new community radio stations to be built in America's largest cities, and smaller communities across the nation.

Oct 30 2007 - 3:00am

Release: Senate Committee Votes to Expand Low Power FM Radio!

October 30th, 2007

Contact: Hannah Sassaman, 215.727.9620 x 501, 267.970.4007, hannahjs(at)prometheusradio.org

The United States Senate Commerce Committee voted this afternoon to substantially expand the number of community media outlets in the United States. In a consensus vote, the Committee moved to report Senate Bill 1675, the Local Community Radio Act of 2007, to the full Senate -- and opened the door for thousands of new community radio stations to be built in America's largest cities, and smaller communities across the nation.

Aug 15 2007 - 10:50pm

Important Community Radio Opporunity for Communities of Color

By Alex Nogales and Joseph Torres

Radio historically has played a critical role in the lives of people of color. In 1924, Pedro J. Gonzalez first took to the airwaves in Los Angeles to stand up for immigrant rights, more than 80 years before millions of Latinos marched in cities and towns throughout our nation in demand of a just immigration system.

Ora Eddleman Reed also began broadcasting in 1924 on KDFN in Wyoming, becoming one of the first American Indians to host a radio program and one of the first talk show hosts in radio history.

During the 1960s, African-American deejays advocated for social change and were instrumental in giving voice to the protest for equality during the civil rights movement.

Despite this long history, radio still fails to reflect the concerns or informational needs of communities of color. According to a recent study by the media reform group Free Press, people of color own just 7.7 percent of the 10,000-plus radio stations in the United States -- even though they currently make up close to 35 percent of the U.S. population. And people of color make up just 6 percent of the U.S. radio workforce, according to the latest study released by the Radio and Television News Directors Association.

While radio remains a critically important medium for communities of color, people of color are seldom in a position to determine the format or editorial direction of a radio station. And increased media concentration has made it more difficult for people of color to purchase a station or to compete in a consolidated marketplace.

But people of color have a rare opportunity this fall to obtain a license to operate a full-power station in many markets across the nation. It is an opportunity they can not pass up.

For one week this fall

Aug 1 2007 - 3:00am
Attorney and human rights activist Efia Nwangaza called on Prometheus and others to help launch WMXP-LP in Greenville, SC, in 2007, featuring programming alternatives for the area’s underserved African-American population. After losing building permits due to maneuvering by a nearby commercial station, a low-power antenna was erected in a local community activist’s back yard.
Jul 21 2007 - 9:18pm

Community Radio Heads Up to the Hill, But Needs a Push

Yeah, I'm a weekend writer but I'm going to use my free pass to post on legislative topics during the week, because this one's important. Today is a huge day for those of us interested in community radio. Back in 2000, Congress passed the Radio Broadcasting Preservation Act that put the kibosh on the issuing of new licenses for low-power FM radio stations.

Jul 18 2007 - 6:29pm

The Great Spectrum Giveaway

This October might be the last chance for local community radio stations to receive high-power licenses from the FCC.

In Thes Times

July 18, 2007

http://www.inthesetimes.com/article/3278/the_great_spectrum_giveaway/

By Megan Tady

The window may be short, but what happens during a one-week period in October could have lasting implications on how many local voices are heard when listeners turn their radio dial.

Jun 27 2007 - 9:24pm

A UMNS Report By Mike Hickcox* June 26, 2007

Known as "radio of the people, for the people, by the people," community radio is trying to break into U.S. large-market airwaves through legislation that would widen opportunities for more organizations to broadcast on Low Power FM stations.

Bills were introduced June 21 in the U.S. Congress that would open the door for more groups to obtain broadcasting licenses.

Jun 26 2007 - 10:07pm

Net Radio Broadcasters Plot "Day of Silence" June 26 

It's the first thing they warn you about when you start in radio: dead air is to be avoided at all costs. But unless radical steps are taken to alter the costs soon to be inflicted on web-based broadcasters, there's going to be a whole lot of dead air streaming over the internet.

On June 26, major webcasters such as Live365.com, Pandora.com, AccuRadio.com, and popular Santa Monica, California-based KCRW are among those who will silence their feeds for 24 hours in a show of solidarity against the upcoming July 15 rate hike on net radio royalties. Though regular programming will indeed be interrupted, the broadcasters won't simply be broadcasting silence; many stations will run intermittent PSAs detailing the current plight of net radio interspersed with ambient noise to give listeners an idea of what they'll be hearing should the royalty increases stand. KCRW is producing an hour-long program pleading the case of net radio entitled "D-Day for Webcasters," which they plan to loop all day Tuesday. Additional broadcasters will continue to be added to the roster of supporters for this day of silence.

In other net radio news, late last month, several large webcasters (including National Public Radio and the Digital Media Association) filed an emergency stay to the U.S. Court of Appeals in the D.C. Circuit, seeking to delay the July 15 rate hike. The decision on whether or not to grant the stay will be made soon in an appellate court. Additionally, on Thursday, June 28, the House Committee on Small Business will hold a hearing between artists and webcasters entitled "Assessing the Impact of the Copyright Royalty Board Decision to Increase Royalty Rates on Recording Artists and Webcasters."

In a related topic, recent bipartisan legislation has been sponsored by Representatives Mike Doyle (D-PA) and Lee Terry (R-NE) and Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Maria Cantwell (D-WA) to expand the way licenses are issued for low-power FM radio stations. (That would be regular terrestrial radio, not internet.)

A 2000 bill permitted churches, schools, labor unions and other community groups to apply for these licenses, but a stipulation in the ruling made the licenses available only in rural areas. The proposed legislation-- the "Local Community Radio Act of 2007"-- seeks to offer urban broadcasters an opportunity to earn one of these licenses, which would allow for innumerable alternatives to the current Clear Channel-dominated terrestrial radio options.