Former FM 'pirate' works to change rules

Former FM 'pirate' works to change rules

Story by Michael Matza - Philadelphia Inquirer Staff Writer - January 9, 2012

For more than a decade, a West Philadelphia buccaneer fought the Federal Communications Commission for access to the airwaves using Pete Tridish - "petri dish" - as his nom de guerre. The name took hold in 1997 when he cofounded Radio Mutiny, the pirate station whose two years on the dial helped bring "low power" to the people.

This year, largely because of the efforts of Tridish and the organization he created, called Prometheus Radio Project, the FCC will grant licenses for up to 3,000 new low-power FM stations nationally, with an estimated five to 10 in the Philadelphia area.


Born Dylan Wrynn in Brooklyn, N.Y., Tridish, 42, has a wild beard, a prankster's magnetism, and a radical's passion for social change. A 1991 graduate of Antioch College, he is a trained radio engineer who also has worked as a carpenter, solar-energy system installer, and a volunteer at a homeless shelter. He helped build stations across the United States, Guatemala, Colombia, Nepal, Tanzania, and Jordan. Mostly, he calls himself a "freelance troublemaker." In this edited conversation with staff writer Michael Matza, he talks about low-power FM and its future. Read the full article here . .